Dr. Ocean on the Toxicities With SM-88 in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

Allyson J. Ocean, MD
Published: Friday, Jan 18, 2019



Allyson J. Ocean, MD, associate professor of clinical medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, discusses her experiences with SM-88 in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Ocean explains that the toxicity profile associated with SM-88, which consists of a tyrosine derivative (D,L-alpha-metyrosine), an mTOR inhibitor (sirolimus), a CYP3a4 inducer (phenytoin), and an oxidative stress catalyst (methoxsalen), is very favorable. Additionally, she adds that she has had a couple of patients who, after receiving treatment with SM-88, explained that they physically felt better as well as more energetic than they had on chemotherapy treatments. The toxicities seen with SM-88 are completely different than those of chemotherapy.

In a study of SM-88 presented at the 2019 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, 32 patients (84.2%) experienced a treatment-emergent adverse event (AE) related to SM-88, with 16.2% of AEs considered to be possibly related to study regimen. One patient who was treated with 460 mg twice daily of D,L-metyrosine had 2 AEs, which were rash and arthralgia, that were considered to be dose-limiting toxicities. However, patients resumed treatment after successful management.

View more from the 2019 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium


Allyson J. Ocean, MD, associate professor of clinical medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, discusses her experiences with SM-88 in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Ocean explains that the toxicity profile associated with SM-88, which consists of a tyrosine derivative (D,L-alpha-metyrosine), an mTOR inhibitor (sirolimus), a CYP3a4 inducer (phenytoin), and an oxidative stress catalyst (methoxsalen), is very favorable. Additionally, she adds that she has had a couple of patients who, after receiving treatment with SM-88, explained that they physically felt better as well as more energetic than they had on chemotherapy treatments. The toxicities seen with SM-88 are completely different than those of chemotherapy.

In a study of SM-88 presented at the 2019 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, 32 patients (84.2%) experienced a treatment-emergent adverse event (AE) related to SM-88, with 16.2% of AEs considered to be possibly related to study regimen. One patient who was treated with 460 mg twice daily of D,L-metyrosine had 2 AEs, which were rash and arthralgia, that were considered to be dose-limiting toxicities. However, patients resumed treatment after successful management.

View more from the 2019 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium

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