Dr. Gomella on the State of Genetic Testing and Screening in Prostate Cancer

Leonard G. Gomella, MD
Published: Friday, Mar 13, 2020



Leonard G. Gomella, MD, professor, chair of the Department of Urology, and director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center Network, of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, discusses the state of genetic testing in prostate cancer.

Genetic testing is taking on a greater role in the field. However, the lack of sufficient genetic counselors has made it challenging to make genetic testing widely accessible to those who could benefit from it most. Investigators are working to develop alternatives that can help circumvent these challenges. For example, investigators at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center are developing an app to help medical oncologists and urologists potentially screen patients for genetic testing, says Gomella.

Screening still remains highly controversial, but the field is getting better at identifying the men who are going to derive the most benefit from this effort. Notably, there is no standard of care for screening for prostate cancer, which has made it difficult to establish guidelines and recommendations for primary care physicians. As such, research efforts have been devoted to developing appropriate approaches and protocols to identify the men who are going to derive the most benefit from screening for prostate cancer, concludes Gomella.

<<< View more from the 2020 New York GU Cancer Conference


Leonard G. Gomella, MD, professor, chair of the Department of Urology, and director of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center Network, of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, discusses the state of genetic testing in prostate cancer.

Genetic testing is taking on a greater role in the field. However, the lack of sufficient genetic counselors has made it challenging to make genetic testing widely accessible to those who could benefit from it most. Investigators are working to develop alternatives that can help circumvent these challenges. For example, investigators at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center are developing an app to help medical oncologists and urologists potentially screen patients for genetic testing, says Gomella.

Screening still remains highly controversial, but the field is getting better at identifying the men who are going to derive the most benefit from this effort. Notably, there is no standard of care for screening for prostate cancer, which has made it difficult to establish guidelines and recommendations for primary care physicians. As such, research efforts have been devoted to developing appropriate approaches and protocols to identify the men who are going to derive the most benefit from screening for prostate cancer, concludes Gomella.

<<< View more from the 2020 New York GU Cancer Conference



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