VISIT US IN CHICAGO JUNE 2-4 AT BOOTH 2073!

Dr. Halmos on MET Mutations in Patients With NSCLC

Balazs Halmos, MD
Published: Monday, Nov 14, 2016



Balazs Halmos, MD, director, Thoracic Oncology, director, Clinical Cancer Genomics, Montefiore Medical Center, discusses the prevalence of MET mutations in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

In the last 2 years, there have been a flurry of developments recognizing that a subset of patients with NSCLC have recurrent genetic abnormalities affecting the MET gene. The first of these is MET amplification which is not very common and is difficult to define, Halmos explains. There needs to be specific thresholds to understand what level of amplification is a key driver event. Lately, high-driver MET amplification has been identified as an area where MET inhibitors will show promise, such as crizotinib (Xalkori) and cabozantinib (Cabometyx).

Additionally, 3% to 4% of patients with NSCLC have sarcomatoid carcinoma of the lung, which involves a recurrent abnormality known as MET exon 14 skipping mutation. This is a unique genetic abnormality caused by a range of genetic abnormalities, he says. This leads to loss of a particular amino acid that is critical to the binding of another protein. The second protein marks the first protein for degradation. This leads to a drive in cancer growth, Halmos explains.

These are cases where MET exon 14 skipping mutations can be identified and potentially treated with MET inhibitors.

  <<< View more from the 2016 New York Lung Cancer Symposium


Balazs Halmos, MD, director, Thoracic Oncology, director, Clinical Cancer Genomics, Montefiore Medical Center, discusses the prevalence of MET mutations in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

In the last 2 years, there have been a flurry of developments recognizing that a subset of patients with NSCLC have recurrent genetic abnormalities affecting the MET gene. The first of these is MET amplification which is not very common and is difficult to define, Halmos explains. There needs to be specific thresholds to understand what level of amplification is a key driver event. Lately, high-driver MET amplification has been identified as an area where MET inhibitors will show promise, such as crizotinib (Xalkori) and cabozantinib (Cabometyx).

Additionally, 3% to 4% of patients with NSCLC have sarcomatoid carcinoma of the lung, which involves a recurrent abnormality known as MET exon 14 skipping mutation. This is a unique genetic abnormality caused by a range of genetic abnormalities, he says. This leads to loss of a particular amino acid that is critical to the binding of another protein. The second protein marks the first protein for degradation. This leads to a drive in cancer growth, Halmos explains.

These are cases where MET exon 14 skipping mutations can be identified and potentially treated with MET inhibitors.

  <<< View more from the 2016 New York Lung Cancer Symposium

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: Updates in Novel Therapeutic Options for Lung Neuroendocrine TumorsMay 31, 20181.0
Community Practice Connections™: Working Group to Optimize Outcomes in EGFR-mutated Lung Cancers: Evolving Concepts for Nurses to Facilitate and Improve Patient CareJun 30, 20181.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x