Dr. Vose Discusses the Importance of Genomic Analysis in NHL

Julie M. Vose, MD
Published: Wednesday, Jul 18, 2018



Julie M. Vose, MD, MBA, professor, internal medicine, chief, Division of Oncology & Hematology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, discusses the importance of genomic analysis in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

Many patients with NHL can be cured, says Vose, but for those with more aggressive disease, or with genetic drivers, more work needs to be done to individualize treatment. Looking at the specific genetic makeup of a patient and targeting those abnormal pathways is the first step, according to Vose. Although, there are some challenges, as there are often multiple pathways to target, and cells can get around these pathways. Vose says that combinations may be a way to address that escape mechanism.

Vose says that genomic analysis needs to be done in every patient with NHL in order to understand their disease and treat them properly. This is particularly true for high-risk patients who usually have less options. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization, and analysis for BCL2, BCL3, and MYC should be done in every patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to increase their chances at a good outcome, or for referral to a clinical trial.


Julie M. Vose, MD, MBA, professor, internal medicine, chief, Division of Oncology & Hematology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, discusses the importance of genomic analysis in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

Many patients with NHL can be cured, says Vose, but for those with more aggressive disease, or with genetic drivers, more work needs to be done to individualize treatment. Looking at the specific genetic makeup of a patient and targeting those abnormal pathways is the first step, according to Vose. Although, there are some challenges, as there are often multiple pathways to target, and cells can get around these pathways. Vose says that combinations may be a way to address that escape mechanism.

Vose says that genomic analysis needs to be done in every patient with NHL in order to understand their disease and treat them properly. This is particularly true for high-risk patients who usually have less options. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization, and analysis for BCL2, BCL3, and MYC should be done in every patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma to increase their chances at a good outcome, or for referral to a clinical trial.

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