Dr. Leon Ferre on the Results of the Randomized Trial of Oxybutynin for Hot Flashes

Roberto A. Leon Ferre, MD
Published: Friday, Dec 07, 2018



Roberto A. Leon Ferre, MD, oncologist, Mayo Clinic, discusses the randomized trial evaluating the effectiveness of oxybutynin chloride in the management of hot flashes in patients with breast cancer at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

At the meeting, results of the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ACCRU study SC-1603) evaluating the use of the antispasmodic and anticholinergic agent in patients who are not candidates for, or are not interested in hormone replacement therapy were presented. Patients were randomized to receive 5 mg of oxybutynin twice daily or 2.5 mg twice daily. A third arm was included to evaluate the role of placebo as there is a 20% to 30% reduction in the incidence of hot flashes with placebo, notes Leon Ferre.

Over the course of the study, patients filled out questionnaires. Patients were also asked to fill out a survey prior to starting therapy to establish a baseline and then continued to do so on a daily or weekly basis. The study took place over the course of 6 weeks, after which the changes in reported outcomes were assessed. Researchers found that patients on both oxybutynin arms, regardless of dose, experienced a reduction in the severity and frequency of hot flashes. An improvement in the degree of interference with work, leisure, and overall quality of life, was also observed, says Leon Ferre.


Roberto A. Leon Ferre, MD, oncologist, Mayo Clinic, discusses the randomized trial evaluating the effectiveness of oxybutynin chloride in the management of hot flashes in patients with breast cancer at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

At the meeting, results of the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ACCRU study SC-1603) evaluating the use of the antispasmodic and anticholinergic agent in patients who are not candidates for, or are not interested in hormone replacement therapy were presented. Patients were randomized to receive 5 mg of oxybutynin twice daily or 2.5 mg twice daily. A third arm was included to evaluate the role of placebo as there is a 20% to 30% reduction in the incidence of hot flashes with placebo, notes Leon Ferre.

Over the course of the study, patients filled out questionnaires. Patients were also asked to fill out a survey prior to starting therapy to establish a baseline and then continued to do so on a daily or weekly basis. The study took place over the course of 6 weeks, after which the changes in reported outcomes were assessed. Researchers found that patients on both oxybutynin arms, regardless of dose, experienced a reduction in the severity and frequency of hot flashes. An improvement in the degree of interference with work, leisure, and overall quality of life, was also observed, says Leon Ferre.



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