Dr. Mark Discusses an Ultra-Restrictive Opioid Prescription Protocol in Postoperative Patients

Jaron Mark, MD
Published: Tuesday, Mar 27, 2018


Jaron Mark, MD, gynecologic oncology fellow, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the implementation of an ultra-restrictive opioid prescription protocol (UROPP) in patients undergoing major gynecologic surgery, which radically decreased dispensed opioids without reducing pain control, during the 2018 Society of Gynecologic Oncology Annual Meeting.

Mark says investigators at Roswell Park noticed many patients, especially those who underwent minimally invasive surgery, said they did not use any of the opioids they were prescribed. With this in mind, as well as the opioid crisis, the UROPP was implemented in June 2017 to September 2017 for all patients undergoing gynecologic surgery. 

Patients who had laparoscopic surgery or minimally invasive surgery who used more than 5 doses of opioids received a small, 3-day supply of 12 tablets. Patients who did not use more than 5 doses were given ibuprofen and acetaminophen.

Overall, the UROPP decreased the amount of opioids prescribed by 85% to postoperative patients without changes in pain scores, patient satisfaction, or increase in medication refills.

Jaron Mark, MD, gynecologic oncology fellow, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the implementation of an ultra-restrictive opioid prescription protocol (UROPP) in patients undergoing major gynecologic surgery, which radically decreased dispensed opioids without reducing pain control, during the 2018 Society of Gynecologic Oncology Annual Meeting.

Mark says investigators at Roswell Park noticed many patients, especially those who underwent minimally invasive surgery, said they did not use any of the opioids they were prescribed. With this in mind, as well as the opioid crisis, the UROPP was implemented in June 2017 to September 2017 for all patients undergoing gynecologic surgery. 

Patients who had laparoscopic surgery or minimally invasive surgery who used more than 5 doses of opioids received a small, 3-day supply of 12 tablets. Patients who did not use more than 5 doses were given ibuprofen and acetaminophen.

Overall, the UROPP decreased the amount of opioids prescribed by 85% to postoperative patients without changes in pain scores, patient satisfaction, or increase in medication refills.

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