Dr. Monk on Choosing Between PARP Inhibitors in Ovarian Cancer

Bradley J. Monk, MD
Published: Sunday, Mar 25, 2018


Bradley J. Monk, MD, professor and director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Arizona Oncology, discusses how to decide which PARP inhibitor to use when treating a patient with ovarian cancer during the 2018 Society of Gynecologic Oncology Annual Meeting.

Up until this point, physicians have been treating based on the label, Monk explains. However, there is now overlap in the different settings with the FDA approved PARP inhibitors, which include olaparib (Lynparza), rucaparib (Rubraca), niraparib (Zejula).

Monk explains that all of the PARP inhibitors are similar in efficacy and cost. Therefore, the decision comes down to familiarity, toxicity, and scheduling.
 

Bradley J. Monk, MD, professor and director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Arizona Oncology, discusses how to decide which PARP inhibitor to use when treating a patient with ovarian cancer during the 2018 Society of Gynecologic Oncology Annual Meeting.

Up until this point, physicians have been treating based on the label, Monk explains. However, there is now overlap in the different settings with the FDA approved PARP inhibitors, which include olaparib (Lynparza), rucaparib (Rubraca), niraparib (Zejula).

Monk explains that all of the PARP inhibitors are similar in efficacy and cost. Therefore, the decision comes down to familiarity, toxicity, and scheduling.
 

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Show Me the Data™: Leveraging Evidence to Optimize Applications of PARP Inhibitor Strategies in Ovarian CancerJun 29, 20191.5
Oncology Briefings™: Current Perspectives on Preventing and Managing Tumor Lysis SyndromeJun 30, 20191.0
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