Dr. Coleman on the Effect of Age on Rucaparib Efficacy in Ovarian Cancer

Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS
Published: Sunday, Mar 17, 2019



Robert Coleman, MD, professor in the Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the effect of age on the efficacy of rucaparib (Rubraca) in patients with recurrent ovarian carcinoma.

Rucaparib tablets were approved by the FDA in April 2018 as a maintenance therapy for patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. The approval was based on data from the phase III ARIEL3 trial, in which the median progression-free survival in the overall study population was 10.8 months with maintenance rucaparib compared with 5.4 months with placebo.

It has been known that age is an important prognostic factor across the board in oncology, explains Coleman. In an analysis of the ARIEL3 trial, presented at the 2019 SGO Annual Meeting, researchers sought to determine whether there was an effect on age linked with the efficacy and toxicity with rucaparib. Elderly patients, he adds, may have a more difficult time on treatment overall.

Results showed that the benefit with rucaparib in all subgroups was similar to the overall population, and for the most part, toxicities were not too different, Coleman says. However, there was a slightly higher rate of treatment discontinuations in patients over the age of 65 treated with rucaparib. In conclusion, Coleman says, rucaparib is a tolerable and efficacious agent, regardless of patient age.

<<< 2019 SGO Annual Meeting


Robert Coleman, MD, professor in the Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the effect of age on the efficacy of rucaparib (Rubraca) in patients with recurrent ovarian carcinoma.

Rucaparib tablets were approved by the FDA in April 2018 as a maintenance therapy for patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. The approval was based on data from the phase III ARIEL3 trial, in which the median progression-free survival in the overall study population was 10.8 months with maintenance rucaparib compared with 5.4 months with placebo.

It has been known that age is an important prognostic factor across the board in oncology, explains Coleman. In an analysis of the ARIEL3 trial, presented at the 2019 SGO Annual Meeting, researchers sought to determine whether there was an effect on age linked with the efficacy and toxicity with rucaparib. Elderly patients, he adds, may have a more difficult time on treatment overall.

Results showed that the benefit with rucaparib in all subgroups was similar to the overall population, and for the most part, toxicities were not too different, Coleman says. However, there was a slightly higher rate of treatment discontinuations in patients over the age of 65 treated with rucaparib. In conclusion, Coleman says, rucaparib is a tolerable and efficacious agent, regardless of patient age.

<<< 2019 SGO Annual Meeting



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