Dr. Lenz on the Benefit of Regorafenib in CRC

Heinz-Josef Lenz, MD
Published: Thursday, Oct 25, 2018



Heinz-Josef Lenz, MD, associate director for Adult Oncology and co-leader of the Gastrointestinal Cancers Program, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the benefit of regorafenib (Stivarga) in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).

Regorafenib is active in patients with refractory CRC and in those who were previously treated with bevacizumab (Avastin), says Lenz. Since the therapy can be quite toxic, physicians should monitor patients on a weekly basis.

Prior to the ReDOS study, physicians were unsure whether to start a patient on 160 mg and anticipate dose reductions or 120 mg. Findings from the ReDOS study demonstrated that patients should start on 80 mg and escalate to 120 mg and potentially 160 mg if there are no dose-limiting toxicities.

Data from the study were presented at the 2018 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium and the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting and showed an extension in progression-free survival. Safer dose escalation with the ReDOS study indicates that the approach does not jeopardize outcomes but rather improves outcomes for this patient population, says Lenz. Most clinical trials and clinical practices have adjusted very quickly to the new ReDOS schedule, Lenz concludes.


Heinz-Josef Lenz, MD, associate director for Adult Oncology and co-leader of the Gastrointestinal Cancers Program, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the benefit of regorafenib (Stivarga) in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).

Regorafenib is active in patients with refractory CRC and in those who were previously treated with bevacizumab (Avastin), says Lenz. Since the therapy can be quite toxic, physicians should monitor patients on a weekly basis.

Prior to the ReDOS study, physicians were unsure whether to start a patient on 160 mg and anticipate dose reductions or 120 mg. Findings from the ReDOS study demonstrated that patients should start on 80 mg and escalate to 120 mg and potentially 160 mg if there are no dose-limiting toxicities.

Data from the study were presented at the 2018 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium and the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting and showed an extension in progression-free survival. Safer dose escalation with the ReDOS study indicates that the approach does not jeopardize outcomes but rather improves outcomes for this patient population, says Lenz. Most clinical trials and clinical practices have adjusted very quickly to the new ReDOS schedule, Lenz concludes.



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