Dr. Camidge on Crizotinib as a ROS1 Inhibitor in NSCLC

D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD
Published: Thursday, Jun 13, 2013

D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director, Thoracic Oncology Clinical Program, University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses the use of crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

ROS1 is a gene rearrangement that is structurally-related and similar to ALK, but is more rare. ROS1 rearrangements occur in about 1% of NSCLC cases but is also present in gallbladder cancer and colorectal cancer. Camidge points out that there is only a certain number of things to drive a cancer and though frequency will vary, researchers and physicians study the same drivers more often.

Crizotinib is so structurally related to ALK, making it an adequate ROS1 inhibitor as well. A 50-60% response has been observed and Camidge says that it could be a better ROS1 inhibitor than an ALK inhibitor.

<<< View more from the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting

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D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, Director, Thoracic Oncology Clinical Program, University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses the use of crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

ROS1 is a gene rearrangement that is structurally-related and similar to ALK, but is more rare. ROS1 rearrangements occur in about 1% of NSCLC cases but is also present in gallbladder cancer and colorectal cancer. Camidge points out that there is only a certain number of things to drive a cancer and though frequency will vary, researchers and physicians study the same drivers more often.

Crizotinib is so structurally related to ALK, making it an adequate ROS1 inhibitor as well. A 50-60% response has been observed and Camidge says that it could be a better ROS1 inhibitor than an ALK inhibitor.

<<< View more from the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting


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