Dr. Brian Durie on Novel Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

Brian G. M. Durie, MD
Published: Tuesday, Jan 15, 2013

Brian G. M. Durie, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Senior Advisor, Hematologic Malignancies, National Program Director, Multiple Myeloma and Related Disorders for Aptium Oncology, discusses the impact that novel therapies have made for patients with multiple myeloma.

The most important novel therapies for multiple myeloma are separated into two classes: 1) immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs): thalidomide (Thalomid), lenalidomide (Revlimid), and pomalidomide, which Durie hopes will be approved, and 2) proteasome inhibitors: carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and bortezomib (Velcade).

Survival curves for multiple myeloma were in decline for decades, Durie says, are steadily coming up. Today, 56% of patients over 65 are living for five years while 70% of patients under 65 are living for five years. It is because of novel therapies that such significant strides have been made from a time when survival was two to three years.

The question in multiple myeloma is how can the steps towards longer survival be translated into steps towards a cure. Focus remains on patients with good prognosis and improved treatment combinations, Durie says, but there is a need for new therapies in aggressive disease.

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Brian G. M. Durie, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Senior Advisor, Hematologic Malignancies, National Program Director, Multiple Myeloma and Related Disorders for Aptium Oncology, discusses the impact that novel therapies have made for patients with multiple myeloma.

The most important novel therapies for multiple myeloma are separated into two classes: 1) immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs): thalidomide (Thalomid), lenalidomide (Revlimid), and pomalidomide, which Durie hopes will be approved, and 2) proteasome inhibitors: carfilzomib (Kyprolis) and bortezomib (Velcade).

Survival curves for multiple myeloma were in decline for decades, Durie says, are steadily coming up. Today, 56% of patients over 65 are living for five years while 70% of patients under 65 are living for five years. It is because of novel therapies that such significant strides have been made from a time when survival was two to three years.

The question in multiple myeloma is how can the steps towards longer survival be translated into steps towards a cure. Focus remains on patients with good prognosis and improved treatment combinations, Durie says, but there is a need for new therapies in aggressive disease.


View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Advances in™ Multiple Myeloma: Changing Treatment Paradigms and the Emerging Potential of CAR T-Cell TherapyAug 30, 20191.5
2nd Annual Live Medical Crossfire®: Hematologic Malignancies OnlineSep 28, 20198.0
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