Dr. Shore on Radium-223 Patient Considerations

Neal D. Shore, MD
Published: Monday, Aug 26, 2013

Neal D. Shore, MD, FACS, Medical Director, Carolina Urologic Research Center, Myrtle Beach, discusses patient considerations following treatment with radium-223 for bone metastases from prostate cancer.

Radium-223 gets into bone lesions in a matter of minutes, Shore says. Radium-223 is not metabolized by a patient's kidneys or liver, it is simply decayed into fecal matter. A patient is at no real risk following infusion, but should avoid contact with fecal matter.
 
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Neal D. Shore, MD, FACS, Medical Director, Carolina Urologic Research Center, Myrtle Beach, discusses patient considerations following treatment with radium-223 for bone metastases from prostate cancer.

Radium-223 gets into bone lesions in a matter of minutes, Shore says. Radium-223 is not metabolized by a patient's kidneys or liver, it is simply decayed into fecal matter. A patient is at no real risk following infusion, but should avoid contact with fecal matter.
 

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