Dr. Ali on Whether Biosimilars Can Replace Biologics in Oncology

Haythem Y. Ali, MD
Published: Wednesday, Aug 29, 2018



Haythem Y. Ali, MD, senior medical oncologist, Henry Ford Hospital, discusses whether biosimilars can replace biologics in oncology.

Innovation is an integral part of oncology, explains Ali. Currently, physicians are not reliant on branded drugs. Therefore, it is likely that the old biologics will be replaced in the development process. Though there are incentives to using biosimilars, it is unlikely that they will be the only available therapies in oncology, says Ali.

In September 2017, ABP-215 (bevacizumab-awwb; Mvasi), a biosimilar for bevacizumab (Avastin), was approved by the FDA for the treatment of adult patients with colorectal, lung, brain, kidney, and cervical cancers. ABP-215 was the first biosimilar to be approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with cancer. In December 2017, MYL-1401O (Ogivri; trastuzumab-dkst), a biosimilar for trastuzumab (Herceptin), was approved for the treatment of HER2-positive patients with breast cancer or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.


Haythem Y. Ali, MD, senior medical oncologist, Henry Ford Hospital, discusses whether biosimilars can replace biologics in oncology.

Innovation is an integral part of oncology, explains Ali. Currently, physicians are not reliant on branded drugs. Therefore, it is likely that the old biologics will be replaced in the development process. Though there are incentives to using biosimilars, it is unlikely that they will be the only available therapies in oncology, says Ali.

In September 2017, ABP-215 (bevacizumab-awwb; Mvasi), a biosimilar for bevacizumab (Avastin), was approved by the FDA for the treatment of adult patients with colorectal, lung, brain, kidney, and cervical cancers. ABP-215 was the first biosimilar to be approved in the United States for the treatment of patients with cancer. In December 2017, MYL-1401O (Ogivri; trastuzumab-dkst), a biosimilar for trastuzumab (Herceptin), was approved for the treatment of HER2-positive patients with breast cancer or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Bridging the Gaps Around Oncology Biosimilars: Assessing the Potential Impact of Emerging Agents to PracticeSep 29, 20181.5
Advent of Oncology Monoclonal Antibody Biosimilars ‒ A European Perspective OnlineNov 30, 20183.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x