Dr. Atkins on CA209-004 Trial Results in Advanced Melanoma

Michael B. Atkins, MD
Published: Thursday, Oct 03, 2019



Michael B. Atkins, MD, deputy director, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses results from the CA209-004 trial, which was a phase I study analyzing patients with advanced, unresectable melanoma treated with nivolumab (Opdivo) plus ipilimumab (Yervoy).

At 4 years, 57% of patients were alive. There was favorable survival of at least 49% in every cohort of patients examined, including those with BRAF mutations, BRAF wild-type disease, PD-L1–positive disease, PD-L1–negative disease, and regardless of the stage, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and whether or not patients had received prior therapy, explains Atkins.

Additionally, 86% of patients who stopped treatment because they completed therapy were still alive for 2 to 3 years after they stopped treatment says Atkins. Of patients who stopped treatment due to toxicity, 70% were still alive. Patients were more likely to complete treatment, says Atkins, if they had a normal LDH, their tumor was BRAF wild-type, and they had not received prior treatment.

Patients who finished treatment had a positive quality of life, according to Atkins. In recent years, melanoma has become curable in the majority of patients, allowing patients to thrive after treatment, concludes Atkins.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Michael B. Atkins, MD, deputy director, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses results from the CA209-004 trial, which was a phase I study analyzing patients with advanced, unresectable melanoma treated with nivolumab (Opdivo) plus ipilimumab (Yervoy).

At 4 years, 57% of patients were alive. There was favorable survival of at least 49% in every cohort of patients examined, including those with BRAF mutations, BRAF wild-type disease, PD-L1–positive disease, PD-L1–negative disease, and regardless of the stage, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and whether or not patients had received prior therapy, explains Atkins.

Additionally, 86% of patients who stopped treatment because they completed therapy were still alive for 2 to 3 years after they stopped treatment says Atkins. Of patients who stopped treatment due to toxicity, 70% were still alive. Patients were more likely to complete treatment, says Atkins, if they had a normal LDH, their tumor was BRAF wild-type, and they had not received prior treatment.

Patients who finished treatment had a positive quality of life, according to Atkins. In recent years, melanoma has become curable in the majority of patients, allowing patients to thrive after treatment, concludes Atkins.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire®: What Does Data Tell Us About How to Optimize Checkpoint Inhibitor Strategies Across Lines of Care for Patients with Melanoma?Nov 30, 20191.5
Community Practice Connections™: 15th Annual International Symposium on Melanoma and Other Cutaneous Malignancies®Apr 30, 20202.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x