Dr. Backes on Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping in Cervical Cancer

Floor J. Backes, MD
Published: Monday, Apr 29, 2019



Floor J. Backes, MD, associate professor, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the use of sentinel lymph node mapping in patients with cervical cancer.

The goal of sentinel lymph node mapping is to limit the morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy, while still being able to identify any potential lymph node involvement, explains Backes. Then, an appropriate treatment plan can be prescribed, she adds.

Typically, the procedure consists of a blue dye—either methylene blue, isosulfan blue, or patent blue. Oftentimes, a different method with lymphoscintigraphy is used, in which technetium-99 is injected directly into the cervix, says Backes. Either lymphoscintigraphy or a handheld probe can be used, she adds. Depending on whether the procedure is done as an open surgery or as a minimally invasive surgery, an immunofluorescent dye can be used, such as indocyanine green, which can then be detected with a near infrared light or camera, says Backes.
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Floor J. Backes, MD, associate professor, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the use of sentinel lymph node mapping in patients with cervical cancer.

The goal of sentinel lymph node mapping is to limit the morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy, while still being able to identify any potential lymph node involvement, explains Backes. Then, an appropriate treatment plan can be prescribed, she adds.

Typically, the procedure consists of a blue dye—either methylene blue, isosulfan blue, or patent blue. Oftentimes, a different method with lymphoscintigraphy is used, in which technetium-99 is injected directly into the cervix, says Backes. Either lymphoscintigraphy or a handheld probe can be used, she adds. Depending on whether the procedure is done as an open surgery or as a minimally invasive surgery, an immunofluorescent dye can be used, such as indocyanine green, which can then be detected with a near infrared light or camera, says Backes.

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