Dr. Backes on the Utility of Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping in Cervical Cancer

Floor J. Backes, MD
Published: Thursday, May 23, 2019



Floor J. Backes, MD, associate professor, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the utility of sentinel lymph node mapping in patients with cervical cancer.

Sentinel lymph node mapping can be an accurate way of assessing potential lymph node involvement in patients with cervical cancer. It has a high sensitivity and detection rate with a low negative predictive value, says Backes. There is, however, a learning curve associated with the procedure, and practice is required to ensure that the sentinel nodes are not overlooked during the operation, she adds.

Nonetheless, it is a great option for patients, as it can reduce the morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy. Now that its use is becoming more widespread in practice, physicians have to take a step back and consider how to optimize the approach, explains Backes. For example, it can be done as an open procedure or robotically, and physicians must ensure that their techniques are the best they can be. Given that data do support the safety and efficacy of the procedure, it is here to stay, Backes concludes.
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Floor J. Backes, MD, associate professor, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the utility of sentinel lymph node mapping in patients with cervical cancer.

Sentinel lymph node mapping can be an accurate way of assessing potential lymph node involvement in patients with cervical cancer. It has a high sensitivity and detection rate with a low negative predictive value, says Backes. There is, however, a learning curve associated with the procedure, and practice is required to ensure that the sentinel nodes are not overlooked during the operation, she adds.

Nonetheless, it is a great option for patients, as it can reduce the morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy. Now that its use is becoming more widespread in practice, physicians have to take a step back and consider how to optimize the approach, explains Backes. For example, it can be done as an open procedure or robotically, and physicians must ensure that their techniques are the best they can be. Given that data do support the safety and efficacy of the procedure, it is here to stay, Backes concludes.

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