Dr. Brown on the Adoption of Genetic Testing

Jubilee Brown, MD
Published: Wednesday, Aug 22, 2018



Jubilee Brown, MD, professor of gynecologic oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas HealthCare System, discusses the adoption of genetic testing into routine clinical practice.

The adoption of genetic testing has become more widespread, says Brown, but not widespread enough. In 2014, the Society of Gynecologic Oncology released guidelines stating that all women with ovarian cancer should undergo genetic testing. In addition to these guidelines, Brown says that the media has helped significantly in bringing genetic testing to the forefront of the conversation. An example of this would be when Angelina Jolie came forward saying that she had testing. This caused a big uptake, says Brown.

Additionally, there are references to testing in the mainstream press, explains Brown. If someone picks up a magazine in a grocery store, they are likely to read about genetic testing. The goal now, says Brown, is to continue to educate people who should be tested, and dispel common misconceptions. Within the medical community, Brown says family practice doctors and internists also need to be educated on testing, as they are the physicians who are the most likely to encounter the people who stand to benefit the most from testing.


Jubilee Brown, MD, professor of gynecologic oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas HealthCare System, discusses the adoption of genetic testing into routine clinical practice.

The adoption of genetic testing has become more widespread, says Brown, but not widespread enough. In 2014, the Society of Gynecologic Oncology released guidelines stating that all women with ovarian cancer should undergo genetic testing. In addition to these guidelines, Brown says that the media has helped significantly in bringing genetic testing to the forefront of the conversation. An example of this would be when Angelina Jolie came forward saying that she had testing. This caused a big uptake, says Brown.

Additionally, there are references to testing in the mainstream press, explains Brown. If someone picks up a magazine in a grocery store, they are likely to read about genetic testing. The goal now, says Brown, is to continue to educate people who should be tested, and dispel common misconceptions. Within the medical community, Brown says family practice doctors and internists also need to be educated on testing, as they are the physicians who are the most likely to encounter the people who stand to benefit the most from testing.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 18th Annual International Lung Cancer Congress®Oct 31, 20181.5
Provider and Caregiver Connection™: Addressing Patient Concerns While Managing Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and VomitingOct 31, 20182.0
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