Dr. Campos Discusses Differences Between PARP Inhibitors in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Susana Campos, MD, MPH
Published: Monday, Mar 04, 2019



Susana Campos, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses differences between PARP inhibitors in recurrent ovarian cancer.

All 3 PARP inhibitors–– olaparib (Lynparza), niraparib (Zejula), and rucaparib (Rubraca) are fairly similar, explains Campos. They have some overlapping adverse events, such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. Gastrointestinal toxicities are also fairly common among the 3 agents. Additionally, there is the potential for myelodysplastic syndrome with all of them. However, there are some toxicities that are unique to each agent, says Campos.

For example, niraparib can result in more thrombocytopenia, although that can be circumvented by lowering the dose. Thrombocytopenia may occur if a patient weighs less than 77 kilograms and has a platelet count of less than 150,000, adds Campos. Moreover, some patients have more photosensitivity on rucaparib, while others lead to an increase in liver function tests. Hypertensive crisis is a potential issue that is specific to niraparib, she adds.

Overall, these agents show a similar side effect profile. Understanding what the patient can tolerate and acclimating to the FDA dosage takes practice, similar to that of other drugs on the market, concludes Campos.
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Susana Campos, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses differences between PARP inhibitors in recurrent ovarian cancer.

All 3 PARP inhibitors–– olaparib (Lynparza), niraparib (Zejula), and rucaparib (Rubraca) are fairly similar, explains Campos. They have some overlapping adverse events, such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia. Gastrointestinal toxicities are also fairly common among the 3 agents. Additionally, there is the potential for myelodysplastic syndrome with all of them. However, there are some toxicities that are unique to each agent, says Campos.

For example, niraparib can result in more thrombocytopenia, although that can be circumvented by lowering the dose. Thrombocytopenia may occur if a patient weighs less than 77 kilograms and has a platelet count of less than 150,000, adds Campos. Moreover, some patients have more photosensitivity on rucaparib, while others lead to an increase in liver function tests. Hypertensive crisis is a potential issue that is specific to niraparib, she adds.

Overall, these agents show a similar side effect profile. Understanding what the patient can tolerate and acclimating to the FDA dosage takes practice, similar to that of other drugs on the market, concludes Campos.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: A Nurses' Guide to Managing Adverse Events Associated with PARP InhibitorsJun 30, 20201.0
Community Practice Connections™: Evolutions in the Treatment and Management of Advanced Cervical Cancer: Leveraging the Immunosuppressive Microenvironment, Addressing Ongoing Clinical NeedsJun 30, 20201.5
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