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Dr. Campos on Next Steps With PARP Inhibitors in Ovarian Cancer

Susana M. Campos, MD
Published: Monday, Oct 15, 2018



Susana M. Campos, MD, gynecologic oncologist, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, discusses next steps with PARP inhibitors in the treatment of patients with ovarian cancer.

As of May 2018, there are 3 FDA-approved PARP inhibitors for the maintenance treatment of patients with ovarian cancer who are in complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy: niraparib (Zejula), olaparib (Lynparza), and rucaparib (Rubraca). Campos says the field has become effective in putting patients in remission; however, where it needs to improve is keeping patients there. It is almost inevitable that patients with ovarian cancer will relapse. This is where PARP inhibitors potentially play their biggest role.

Mainly, PARP inhibitors have improved progression-free survival. In the next few years, Campos is hopeful to see a different application of these drugs, perhaps in an earlier treatment setting. An important question is how PARP inhibitors will synergize with other drugs. Researchers are also trying to see if combining PARP inhibitors with immunotherapies or other targeted agents will help to overcome PARP resistance.


Susana M. Campos, MD, gynecologic oncologist, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, discusses next steps with PARP inhibitors in the treatment of patients with ovarian cancer.

As of May 2018, there are 3 FDA-approved PARP inhibitors for the maintenance treatment of patients with ovarian cancer who are in complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy: niraparib (Zejula), olaparib (Lynparza), and rucaparib (Rubraca). Campos says the field has become effective in putting patients in remission; however, where it needs to improve is keeping patients there. It is almost inevitable that patients with ovarian cancer will relapse. This is where PARP inhibitors potentially play their biggest role.

Mainly, PARP inhibitors have improved progression-free survival. In the next few years, Campos is hopeful to see a different application of these drugs, perhaps in an earlier treatment setting. An important question is how PARP inhibitors will synergize with other drugs. Researchers are also trying to see if combining PARP inhibitors with immunotherapies or other targeted agents will help to overcome PARP resistance.



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