Dr. Chao on Practice-Changing Data in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

Joseph Chao, MD
Published: Wednesday, Jan 30, 2019



Joseph Chao, MD, assistant clinical professor, Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research, City of Hope, discusses practice-changing data in metastatic gastroesophageal (GEJ) cancer.

Based on the results of the phase III TAGS trial presented at the 2018 ESMO Congress, TAS-102 (trifluridine/tipiracil; FTD/TPI; Lonsurf) was shown to be safe and effective in patients with refractory metastatic GEJ cancer. The combination showed a statistically significant improvement in median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), irrespective of prior gastrectomy, compared with best supportive care and placebo, says Chao. Patients who received TAS-102 experienced a median OS of 5.7 versus 3.6 months in those who received placebo. The rates of median PFS with TAS-102 and placebo were 2.0 and 1.8 months, respectively.

Patients enrolled in the study had to have received at least 2 prior lines of therapy, but many patients had progressed on as many as 4 lines of therapy, explains Chao. Although response rates were modest, many patients achieved disease control.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


Joseph Chao, MD, assistant clinical professor, Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research, City of Hope, discusses practice-changing data in metastatic gastroesophageal (GEJ) cancer.

Based on the results of the phase III TAGS trial presented at the 2018 ESMO Congress, TAS-102 (trifluridine/tipiracil; FTD/TPI; Lonsurf) was shown to be safe and effective in patients with refractory metastatic GEJ cancer. The combination showed a statistically significant improvement in median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), irrespective of prior gastrectomy, compared with best supportive care and placebo, says Chao. Patients who received TAS-102 experienced a median OS of 5.7 versus 3.6 months in those who received placebo. The rates of median PFS with TAS-102 and placebo were 2.0 and 1.8 months, respectively.

Patients enrolled in the study had to have received at least 2 prior lines of therapy, but many patients had progressed on as many as 4 lines of therapy, explains Chao. Although response rates were modest, many patients achieved disease control.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRCAug 29, 20191.0
Community Practice Connections™: Navigating New Sequencing Challenges for the Treatment of Hepatocellular CarcinomaAug 30, 20191.5
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x