Dr. Cho on Targets for Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

Hearn Jay Cho, MD, PhD
Published: Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019



Hearn Jay Cho, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses current and emerging targets for immunotherapy in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma.

There are currently 2 FDA approved monoclonal antibodies in this space: daratumumab (Darzalex), which targets CD38, and elotuzumab (Empliciti), which targets SLAMF7, says Cho. Both of these immunotherapy agents, particularly when used in combination with lenalidomide (Lenvima) and pomalidomide (Pomalyst)-based regimens, have shown impressive response rates.

BCMA is another significant target in multiple myeloma with several corresponding antibody-based therapies similar to chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies. These agents, specifically BCMA antibody-drug conjugates and bispecific agents, have shown promising response data in early-phase clinical trials.

Additionally, there are several other targets and drugs under clinical investigation, Cho says. In particular, researchers are looking at different strategies for targeting CD38 and CD138. Although it’s unclear whether there’s a superior target in multiple myeloma, Cho notes that there’s a clear interest in BCMA, and that it will be interesting to see how that research pans out.
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Hearn Jay Cho, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses current and emerging targets for immunotherapy in the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma.

There are currently 2 FDA approved monoclonal antibodies in this space: daratumumab (Darzalex), which targets CD38, and elotuzumab (Empliciti), which targets SLAMF7, says Cho. Both of these immunotherapy agents, particularly when used in combination with lenalidomide (Lenvima) and pomalidomide (Pomalyst)-based regimens, have shown impressive response rates.

BCMA is another significant target in multiple myeloma with several corresponding antibody-based therapies similar to chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies. These agents, specifically BCMA antibody-drug conjugates and bispecific agents, have shown promising response data in early-phase clinical trials.

Additionally, there are several other targets and drugs under clinical investigation, Cho says. In particular, researchers are looking at different strategies for targeting CD38 and CD138. Although it’s unclear whether there’s a superior target in multiple myeloma, Cho notes that there’s a clear interest in BCMA, and that it will be interesting to see how that research pans out.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Archived Version of a Live Webcast: Virtual Current Trends™: European Perspectives on the Advancing Role of CAR T-Cell Therapy in Hematologic MalignanciesJun 29, 20192.0
Community Practice Connections™: Practical Application of Sequencing for EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancers: A Focus on Recent Evidence and Key Next Steps in TrialsJun 29, 20192.5
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