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Dr. Choi on Considering Factors for RT in Prostate Cancer

Seungtaek L. Choi, MD
Published: Monday, Aug 07, 2017



Seungtaek L. Choi, MD, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, and clinical medical director, Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the considering factors for patients to receive radiation therapy (RT) for their prostate cancer.

One of the challenges with choosing treatment is that are numerous options available, Choi explains. However, for most patients, both surgery and RT are good options with a very high chance for cure and low risk for side effects. Nevertheless, there are some patients who are more likely to benefit from RT, which are those who have comorbidities, such as heart disease. Other patients who might benefit better are those with very aggressive disease who might undergo RT anyway even if they had surgery. It is controversial whether RT by itself is less effective than RT plus surgery he adds.

There are some side effects that some patients want to avoid when choosing between treatments. Urinary incontinence is a risk factor with surgery and is not as common with RT.


Seungtaek L. Choi, MD, an assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, and clinical medical director, Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the considering factors for patients to receive radiation therapy (RT) for their prostate cancer.

One of the challenges with choosing treatment is that are numerous options available, Choi explains. However, for most patients, both surgery and RT are good options with a very high chance for cure and low risk for side effects. Nevertheless, there are some patients who are more likely to benefit from RT, which are those who have comorbidities, such as heart disease. Other patients who might benefit better are those with very aggressive disease who might undergo RT anyway even if they had surgery. It is controversial whether RT by itself is less effective than RT plus surgery he adds.

There are some side effects that some patients want to avoid when choosing between treatments. Urinary incontinence is a risk factor with surgery and is not as common with RT.



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