Dr. Coleman on Investigational Treatment Strategies in Cervical Cancer

Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS
Published: Thursday, Nov 07, 2019



Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor and Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, Division of Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses investigational treatment strategies in cervical cancer.

By evaluating the tumor and the microenvironment in more detail, investigators are starting to identify potential new treatment options. One such treatment is antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) that target tissue factor, says Coleman. One ADC has shown promising data in the phase II setting, and it’s now being evaluated in the recurrent setting both alone and in combination with other drugs as part of ongoing studies within the Gynecologic Oncology Group Foundation, adds Coleman.

Additionally, now that bevacizumab (Avastin) is approved for use in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced stage or recurrent cervical cancer, investigators are looking to expand its use. Since immunotherapy has shown activity in cervical cancer, it would be logical to evaluate that approach in combination with bevacizumab and chemotherapy, concludes Coleman.
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Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS, professor and Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, Division of Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses investigational treatment strategies in cervical cancer.

By evaluating the tumor and the microenvironment in more detail, investigators are starting to identify potential new treatment options. One such treatment is antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) that target tissue factor, says Coleman. One ADC has shown promising data in the phase II setting, and it’s now being evaluated in the recurrent setting both alone and in combination with other drugs as part of ongoing studies within the Gynecologic Oncology Group Foundation, adds Coleman.

Additionally, now that bevacizumab (Avastin) is approved for use in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced stage or recurrent cervical cancer, investigators are looking to expand its use. Since immunotherapy has shown activity in cervical cancer, it would be logical to evaluate that approach in combination with bevacizumab and chemotherapy, concludes Coleman.



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