Dr. Davis on Immunotherapy in HER2-Positive Gastric/GEJ Cancer

S. Lindsey Davis, MD
Published: Tuesday, Sep 03, 2019



S. Lindsey Davis, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses an investigational immunotherapy combination being explored in patients with HER2-positive gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer.

Although the phase III KEYNOTE-062 trial was negative, there are still many opportunities and new combinations for immunotherapy in the field, explains Davis. For example, data from a single-center phase II trial from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center showed that the addition of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) to standard frontline therapy in previously untreated patients with metastatic HER2-positive gastric/GEJ cancer resulted in high response rates and disease control.

Results from the trial showed that the combination induced a partial response rate of 87% and a disease control rate of 100% among 32 evaluable patients. Although this was a phase II trial, it is exciting, says Davis. These data have led to the phase III KEYNOTE-811 trial, in which progression-free survival and overall survival will serve as co-primary endpoints.
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S. Lindsey Davis, MD, an assistant professor of medicine and gastrointestinal medical oncologist at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, discusses an investigational immunotherapy combination being explored in patients with HER2-positive gastric and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer.

Although the phase III KEYNOTE-062 trial was negative, there are still many opportunities and new combinations for immunotherapy in the field, explains Davis. For example, data from a single-center phase II trial from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center showed that the addition of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) to standard frontline therapy in previously untreated patients with metastatic HER2-positive gastric/GEJ cancer resulted in high response rates and disease control.

Results from the trial showed that the combination induced a partial response rate of 87% and a disease control rate of 100% among 32 evaluable patients. Although this was a phase II trial, it is exciting, says Davis. These data have led to the phase III KEYNOTE-811 trial, in which progression-free survival and overall survival will serve as co-primary endpoints.

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