Dr. Decker on Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Cancer

Roy Decker, MD, PhD
Published: Wednesday, Sep 07, 2016



Roy Decker, MD, PhD, associate professor of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale Cancer Center, discusses stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a treatment for patients with lung cancer.

Although SBRT has only been around for about 20 years, it is rapidly becoming a standard of care approach for patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are not eligible for surgery, says Decker.

A number of attempts to initiate randomized trials comparing the efficacy of SBRT with surgery have failed, mainly due to poor accrual. Currently, a large consortium trial is underway comparing lobectomy with SBRT for patients with early-stage NSCLC who are at a borderline risk for surgery.
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Roy Decker, MD, PhD, associate professor of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale Cancer Center, discusses stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a treatment for patients with lung cancer.

Although SBRT has only been around for about 20 years, it is rapidly becoming a standard of care approach for patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are not eligible for surgery, says Decker.

A number of attempts to initiate randomized trials comparing the efficacy of SBRT with surgery have failed, mainly due to poor accrual. Currently, a large consortium trial is underway comparing lobectomy with SBRT for patients with early-stage NSCLC who are at a borderline risk for surgery.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Year in Review™: Reflecting on Recent Evidence With an Eye to the Future of Lung Cancer ManagementMar 30, 20191.5
Online Medical Crossfire®: 5th Annual Miami Lung Cancer ConferenceMay 30, 20196.5
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