Dr. Denes Discusses Biosimilar Pricing in Oncology

Alex E. Denes, MD
Published: Thursday, Aug 23, 2018



Alex E. Denes, MD, associate professor of medicine, School of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, discusses biosimilar pricing in oncology.

One of the goals of introducing biosimilars into the oncology landscape is to create competition that will result in decreased drug costs. This is modeled after the success seen with generics, which decreased drug cost significantly since their introduction. Denes believes that biosimilars will drive down the cost of biologics, which is currently extremely high and unsustainable. This is in part due to the cost of clinical trials, which Denes explains cost upwards of $200 million.

Additionally, Denes says that doctors will have a decreased say in the prescription of biosimilars once they are on the market. Although it is up to the clinician to order the drug, there are pressures from hospital systems, payers, and healthcare plans to choose the biologic or the biosimilar. If the copay for the biosimilar is lower than the biologic, then that might persuade patients to request the biosimilar.
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Alex E. Denes, MD, associate professor of medicine, School of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, discusses biosimilar pricing in oncology.

One of the goals of introducing biosimilars into the oncology landscape is to create competition that will result in decreased drug costs. This is modeled after the success seen with generics, which decreased drug cost significantly since their introduction. Denes believes that biosimilars will drive down the cost of biologics, which is currently extremely high and unsustainable. This is in part due to the cost of clinical trials, which Denes explains cost upwards of $200 million.

Additionally, Denes says that doctors will have a decreased say in the prescription of biosimilars once they are on the market. Although it is up to the clinician to order the drug, there are pressures from hospital systems, payers, and healthcare plans to choose the biologic or the biosimilar. If the copay for the biosimilar is lower than the biologic, then that might persuade patients to request the biosimilar.

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Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Evaluating the Emerging Role of Biosimilar Agents for the Treatment of Hematologic MalignanciesMar 08, 20193.0
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