Dr. Dorff on Role of Chemotherapy in mCRPC

Tanya Dorff, MD
Published: Wednesday, Oct 05, 2016



Tanya Dorff, MD, assistant professor of Clinical Medicine, Keck Medicine of University of Southern California, discusses the role of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and pivotal clinical trials that have explored this.

Chemotherapy previously was used at the point of castration resistance when hormone therapy was beginning to fail. However, pivotal clinical trials, such as CHAARTED, STAMPEDE, and GETUG 14, demonstrated that early treatment with chemotherapy in newly diagnosed patients with mCRPC who are just beginning hormone therapy will have a more significant benefit.

However, chemotherapy is a toxic treatment, and some high-volume patients may have more of a benefit than others.
 
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Tanya Dorff, MD, assistant professor of Clinical Medicine, Keck Medicine of University of Southern California, discusses the role of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and pivotal clinical trials that have explored this.

Chemotherapy previously was used at the point of castration resistance when hormone therapy was beginning to fail. However, pivotal clinical trials, such as CHAARTED, STAMPEDE, and GETUG 14, demonstrated that early treatment with chemotherapy in newly diagnosed patients with mCRPC who are just beginning hormone therapy will have a more significant benefit.

However, chemotherapy is a toxic treatment, and some high-volume patients may have more of a benefit than others.
 

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