Dr. Esteva Discusses T-DM1 in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

Francisco J. Esteva, MD, PhD
Published: Monday, Jun 22, 2015



Francisco J. Esteva, MD, PhD, professor, Department of Medicine, associate director, Clinical Investigation Perlmutter Cancer Center, director, Breast Medical Oncology Program, NYU Langone Medical Center, discusses the efficacy of T-DM1 in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

Esteva describes T-DM1 as an antibody bound to a toxin that is effective in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, as well as many patients with refractory disease who have progressed following treatment with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy.

Common adverse events associated with T-DM1 include thrombocytopenia and hepatic toxicity, both of which are manageable but discontinuation of treatment can occur if necessary, Esteva says. It is interesting that thrombocytopenia can occur, he adds, since platelets do not express the HER2 receptor.


Francisco J. Esteva, MD, PhD, professor, Department of Medicine, associate director, Clinical Investigation Perlmutter Cancer Center, director, Breast Medical Oncology Program, NYU Langone Medical Center, discusses the efficacy of T-DM1 in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

Esteva describes T-DM1 as an antibody bound to a toxin that is effective in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, as well as many patients with refractory disease who have progressed following treatment with trastuzumab-based chemotherapy.

Common adverse events associated with T-DM1 include thrombocytopenia and hepatic toxicity, both of which are manageable but discontinuation of treatment can occur if necessary, Esteva says. It is interesting that thrombocytopenia can occur, he adds, since platelets do not express the HER2 receptor.



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