Dr. Ferguson on Surgical Approaches in Cervical Cancer

Sarah Ferguson, MD, FRCSC
Published: Wednesday, Apr 03, 2019



Sarah Ferguson, MD, FRCSC, associate professor of gynecologic oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, discusses surgical approaches in patients with cervical cancer.

Physicians are currently able to perform a minimally invasive radical hysterectomy. However, it’s unclear if there’s a specific patient population that will benefit from this approach over others, Ferguson says. In a study presented at the 2019 SGO Annual Meeting, there was no clear difference in smaller, microscopic tumor samples between patients who received minimally invasive surgery and those who received a traditional open procedure. However, Ferguson notes, if a patient has a microscopic tumor with no residual disease, it is not unreasonable to think that their subsequent surgical approach will have an impact on their oncologic outcome.

Because the data are not yet well defined, it is important for physicians to have the conversation with patients about which approach they prefer. With open surgery, there is a risk in certain patients for increased hospitalization and adverse events.
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Sarah Ferguson, MD, FRCSC, associate professor of gynecologic oncology, University of Toronto, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, discusses surgical approaches in patients with cervical cancer.

Physicians are currently able to perform a minimally invasive radical hysterectomy. However, it’s unclear if there’s a specific patient population that will benefit from this approach over others, Ferguson says. In a study presented at the 2019 SGO Annual Meeting, there was no clear difference in smaller, microscopic tumor samples between patients who received minimally invasive surgery and those who received a traditional open procedure. However, Ferguson notes, if a patient has a microscopic tumor with no residual disease, it is not unreasonable to think that their subsequent surgical approach will have an impact on their oncologic outcome.

Because the data are not yet well defined, it is important for physicians to have the conversation with patients about which approach they prefer. With open surgery, there is a risk in certain patients for increased hospitalization and adverse events.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: 2nd Annual School of Nursing Oncology™Sep 28, 20191.5
Enduring CME activity from the September 4, 2018, Live Webcast: Meeting Unmet Clinical Needs in Cervical Cancer: Paving a New Course in Advanced Disease Settings With Immune-Based StrategiesSep 28, 20191.5
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