Dr. Figlin on Next Steps for Research in mRCC

Robert A. Figlin, MD
Published: Monday, Apr 15, 2019



Robert A. Figlin, MD, director, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Steven Spielberg Professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses next steps for research in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).

With the advancement that has been seen in this setting over the last few years, Figlin says several things can be accomplished in the near future. First, researchers need to clarify the potential of immunotherapy approaches as well as which approaches are optimal. Moreover, whether single-agent or combination approaches offer the greatest value of care in terms of risk control, tolerability, long-term benefit, and maintained remissions. Whether this can be achieved with combinations of checkpoint inhibitors or checkpoint inhibitors plus VEGF TKIs remains to be seen.

However, even if the field is highly successful with immunotherapy, there will still be a population of patients who won’t benefit, Figlin notes. Thus, researchers need to continue to identify novel targets and novel therapeutic strategies. This could include an agent like bempegaldesleukin (NKTR-214), a first-in-class, CD-122-preferential IL-2 pathway agonist, in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor, says Figlin. There are also ongoing studies looking at the role of glutaminase inhibitors in this space.
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Robert A. Figlin, MD, director, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Steven Spielberg Professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses next steps for research in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).

With the advancement that has been seen in this setting over the last few years, Figlin says several things can be accomplished in the near future. First, researchers need to clarify the potential of immunotherapy approaches as well as which approaches are optimal. Moreover, whether single-agent or combination approaches offer the greatest value of care in terms of risk control, tolerability, long-term benefit, and maintained remissions. Whether this can be achieved with combinations of checkpoint inhibitors or checkpoint inhibitors plus VEGF TKIs remains to be seen.

However, even if the field is highly successful with immunotherapy, there will still be a population of patients who won’t benefit, Figlin notes. Thus, researchers need to continue to identify novel targets and novel therapeutic strategies. This could include an agent like bempegaldesleukin (NKTR-214), a first-in-class, CD-122-preferential IL-2 pathway agonist, in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor, says Figlin. There are also ongoing studies looking at the role of glutaminase inhibitors in this space.



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Community Practice Connections™: New Directions in Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Emerging Evidence of ImmunotherapyAug 13, 20191.5
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