Dr. Figlin on Treatment Strategies in Advanced RCC

Robert A. Figlin, MD, FACP
Published: Monday, Nov 19, 2018



Robert A. Figlin, MD, director of the Division of Hematology/Oncology and Steven Spielberg Professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses treatment strategies for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Targeted agents like sunitinib (Sutent) and cabozantinib (Cabometyx) as well as immunotherapy have significantly impacted the treatment paradigm in RCC. These therapies have shown efficacy as single agents, but there is also interest in exploring them in combination. Figlin says oncologists feel a lot more comfortable in handling the toxicities of checkpoint inhibitors, and when combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitors there likely will not be any added unique adverse events.

The key factor in deciding on the strongest treatment option is going to be based on the desired endpoint—overall survival, progression-free survival, objective response rate, or toxicity profile. These endpoints could all help oncologists distinguish between attractive regimens.

Conversations with patients greatly differ from exchanges shared in the past. There are therapies available now that can help patients with RCC maintain their quality of life, which is also very important, Figlin adds.
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Robert A. Figlin, MD, director of the Division of Hematology/Oncology and Steven Spielberg Professor of Biomedical Sciences and Medicine at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, discusses treatment strategies for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Targeted agents like sunitinib (Sutent) and cabozantinib (Cabometyx) as well as immunotherapy have significantly impacted the treatment paradigm in RCC. These therapies have shown efficacy as single agents, but there is also interest in exploring them in combination. Figlin says oncologists feel a lot more comfortable in handling the toxicities of checkpoint inhibitors, and when combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitors there likely will not be any added unique adverse events.

The key factor in deciding on the strongest treatment option is going to be based on the desired endpoint—overall survival, progression-free survival, objective response rate, or toxicity profile. These endpoints could all help oncologists distinguish between attractive regimens.

Conversations with patients greatly differ from exchanges shared in the past. There are therapies available now that can help patients with RCC maintain their quality of life, which is also very important, Figlin adds.

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