Dr. Fizazi Discusses Updated Data With Darolutamide in CRPC

Karim Fizazi, MD, PhD
Published: Wednesday, Jun 12, 2019



Karim Fizazi, MD, PhD, head, Department of Cancer Medicine, Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Villejuif, France, discusses updated data with darolutamide in nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

At the 2019 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, initial phase III data from the ARAMIS trial were presented, showing that the addition of darolutamide to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) reduced the risk of metastases or death by 59% compared with ADT alone. Updated data were presented at the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting, with a focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Researchers showed that the addition of darolutamide to ADT significantly delayed prostate-specific antigen progression compared with placebo, which is important for patients in terms of anxiety and quality of life (QoL), Fizazi says. Moreover, the androgen receptor inhibitor reduced pain progression by approximately 40% compared with placebo.

PROs were recorded by various questionnaires, Fizazi notes, but they all appeared to show that QoL was maintained with darolutamide. The drug also appeared to prevent local symptoms. In general, darolutamide seems to be an effective and tolerable treatment option, Fizazi concludes.
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Karim Fizazi, MD, PhD, head, Department of Cancer Medicine, Gustave Roussy Cancer Center, Villejuif, France, discusses updated data with darolutamide in nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

At the 2019 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, initial phase III data from the ARAMIS trial were presented, showing that the addition of darolutamide to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) reduced the risk of metastases or death by 59% compared with ADT alone. Updated data were presented at the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting, with a focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Researchers showed that the addition of darolutamide to ADT significantly delayed prostate-specific antigen progression compared with placebo, which is important for patients in terms of anxiety and quality of life (QoL), Fizazi says. Moreover, the androgen receptor inhibitor reduced pain progression by approximately 40% compared with placebo.

PROs were recorded by various questionnaires, Fizazi notes, but they all appeared to show that QoL was maintained with darolutamide. The drug also appeared to prevent local symptoms. In general, darolutamide seems to be an effective and tolerable treatment option, Fizazi concludes.

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