Dr. Glaser on Managing Radiation-Induced AEs in Early Breast Cancer

Scott Glaser, MD
Published: Thursday, May 02, 2019



Scott Glaser, MD, assistant clinical professor of radiation oncology, City of Hope, discusses strategies for managing radiation-induced adverse events (AEs) in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

All women undergoing breast radiation are counseled on skin care. Skin AEs are the most common acute side effects that are seen as a result of radiation therapy, Glaser says. There are multiple, commercial topical ointments that physicians utilize to help patients in that sense.

With 3D planning, radiation oncologists are able to minimize doses to the heart and lungs which may decrease the incidence of long-term side effects. One of the ways exposure to the heart is avoided is through a deep inspiratory breath hold technique for patients with left-sided breast cancer. This method treats patients while they are taking a deep respiration, creating distance between the chest wall and heart. There are numerous ways that oncologists can make radiation better, Glaser concludes.
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Scott Glaser, MD, assistant clinical professor of radiation oncology, City of Hope, discusses strategies for managing radiation-induced adverse events (AEs) in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

All women undergoing breast radiation are counseled on skin care. Skin AEs are the most common acute side effects that are seen as a result of radiation therapy, Glaser says. There are multiple, commercial topical ointments that physicians utilize to help patients in that sense.

With 3D planning, radiation oncologists are able to minimize doses to the heart and lungs which may decrease the incidence of long-term side effects. One of the ways exposure to the heart is avoided is through a deep inspiratory breath hold technique for patients with left-sided breast cancer. This method treats patients while they are taking a deep respiration, creating distance between the chest wall and heart. There are numerous ways that oncologists can make radiation better, Glaser concludes.



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