Dr. Hutchings on the Aim of the ECHELON-1 Study in Hodgkin Lymphoma

Martin Hutchings, MD, PhD
Published: Tuesday, Jul 24, 2018



Martin Hutchings, MD, PhD, staff specialist, Department of Hematology, Finsen Centre, National Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, discusses the aim of the ECHELON-1 study in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL).

The randomized, phase III ECHELON-1 study is evaluating brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris) plus chemotherapy in patients with high-risk advanced-stage cHL. Primary results showed a statistically significant improvement in modified progression-free survival in patients with stage III and stage IV cHL who received frontline brentuximab vedotin plus doxorubicin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (A+AVD).

In a prespecified subgroup analysis presented at the 2018 European Hematology Association Congress, frontline A+AVD is favorable to standard doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) in high-risk patients. With ABVD, roughly 25% to 30% of patients fail treatment, says Hutchings, so there is room for improvement. Additionally, bleomycin is a very toxic therapy, and this approach would spare patients of those adverse events.


Martin Hutchings, MD, PhD, staff specialist, Department of Hematology, Finsen Centre, National Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, discusses the aim of the ECHELON-1 study in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL).

The randomized, phase III ECHELON-1 study is evaluating brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris) plus chemotherapy in patients with high-risk advanced-stage cHL. Primary results showed a statistically significant improvement in modified progression-free survival in patients with stage III and stage IV cHL who received frontline brentuximab vedotin plus doxorubicin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (A+AVD).

In a prespecified subgroup analysis presented at the 2018 European Hematology Association Congress, frontline A+AVD is favorable to standard doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) in high-risk patients. With ABVD, roughly 25% to 30% of patients fail treatment, says Hutchings, so there is room for improvement. Additionally, bleomycin is a very toxic therapy, and this approach would spare patients of those adverse events.

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