Dr. Karmali Discusses Toxicites Associated With CAR T-Cell Therapies

Reem Karmali, MD
Published: Friday, Oct 20, 2017



Reem Karmali, MD, assistant professor of medicine (hematology and oncology), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, discusses the toxicities associated with the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies.

There are 2 main toxicities that experts are worried about, says Karmali—cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. It is not yet clear what the mechanism is for neurotoxicity.

Karmali says that the patients being selected should have relatively preserved organ function so that they can withstand these toxicities.
 


Reem Karmali, MD, assistant professor of medicine (hematology and oncology), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, discusses the toxicities associated with the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies.

There are 2 main toxicities that experts are worried about, says Karmali—cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. It is not yet clear what the mechanism is for neurotoxicity.

Karmali says that the patients being selected should have relatively preserved organ function so that they can withstand these toxicities.
 

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Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire®: Management of Adverse Events Associated with Therapies for Hematological Disorders: Nurses' PerspectiveApr 21, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: 21st Annual International Congress on Hematologic Malignancies®: Focus on Leukemias, Lymphomas, and MyelomaApr 27, 20182.0
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