Dr. Kim Discusses Minimally Invasive Surgery and Laparotomic Surgery in Cervical Cancer

Se Ik Kim, MD
Published: Monday, May 13, 2019



Se Ik Kim, MD, research fellow, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Hospital, discusses the use of minimally invasive surgery and laparotomic surgery in patients with cervical cancer.

At the 2019 SOGO Annual Meeting, Kim and colleagues presented data from a retrospective analysis, which compared minimally invasive surgery with laparotomic surgery as primary therapy for patients with stage IA1-IIA2 cervical cancer. A total of 593 patients were included in the analysis, says Kim. Investigators collected clinical pathologic data from patients who underwent open radical hysterectomy and from those who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (n = 158).

Results indicated a higher incidence of disease recurrence with laparoscopic radical hysterectomy compared with open radical hysterectomy, says Kim. However, overall survival was similar between the 2 arms. Multivariate analysis indicated laparoscopic hysterectomy to be an independent poor prognostic factor, he adds. Additional analysis revealed that the size of the cervical mass had an impact on survival.
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Se Ik Kim, MD, research fellow, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Hospital, discusses the use of minimally invasive surgery and laparotomic surgery in patients with cervical cancer.

At the 2019 SOGO Annual Meeting, Kim and colleagues presented data from a retrospective analysis, which compared minimally invasive surgery with laparotomic surgery as primary therapy for patients with stage IA1-IIA2 cervical cancer. A total of 593 patients were included in the analysis, says Kim. Investigators collected clinical pathologic data from patients who underwent open radical hysterectomy and from those who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (n = 158).

Results indicated a higher incidence of disease recurrence with laparoscopic radical hysterectomy compared with open radical hysterectomy, says Kim. However, overall survival was similar between the 2 arms. Multivariate analysis indicated laparoscopic hysterectomy to be an independent poor prognostic factor, he adds. Additional analysis revealed that the size of the cervical mass had an impact on survival.

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