Dr. Levy on Emerging Biomarkers and Corresponding Therapies in Lung Cancer

Benjamin P. Levy, MD
Published: Friday, Apr 03, 2020



Benjamin P. Levy, MD, associate professor of oncology and clinical director of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, discusses emerging biomarkers and their respective therapies in lung cancer.

Many emerging biomarkers that will soon have targeted therapies are being investigated in lung cancer, says Levy. For MET exon 14–skipping mutations, 2 new drugs are being evaluated: capmatinib and tepotinib. For RET fusions, selpercatinib (LOXO-292) has shown an objective response rate (ORR) upward of 85%, adds Levy. Additionally, AMG 510 is an oral therapy for KRAS G12C mutations that has been shown to induce an ORR of 48%, adds Levy. These emerging biomarkers will soon have approved therapies, according to Levy.

Improved understanding of tumor biology leads to the development of better-tailored therapies; these therapies result in better outcomes for patients with alterations, says Levy. With drug approvals anticipated in the next 12 to 24 months, it to be a fascinating time to be working in lung cancer and to see the development of precision medicine, concludes Levy.
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Benjamin P. Levy, MD, associate professor of oncology and clinical director of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Medicine, discusses emerging biomarkers and their respective therapies in lung cancer.

Many emerging biomarkers that will soon have targeted therapies are being investigated in lung cancer, says Levy. For MET exon 14–skipping mutations, 2 new drugs are being evaluated: capmatinib and tepotinib. For RET fusions, selpercatinib (LOXO-292) has shown an objective response rate (ORR) upward of 85%, adds Levy. Additionally, AMG 510 is an oral therapy for KRAS G12C mutations that has been shown to induce an ORR of 48%, adds Levy. These emerging biomarkers will soon have approved therapies, according to Levy.

Improved understanding of tumor biology leads to the development of better-tailored therapies; these therapies result in better outcomes for patients with alterations, says Levy. With drug approvals anticipated in the next 12 to 24 months, it to be a fascinating time to be working in lung cancer and to see the development of precision medicine, concludes Levy.



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