Dr. Lossos on Treatment Approaches in MCL

Izidore S. Lossos, MD
Published: Monday, Mar 18, 2019



Izidore S. Lossos, MD, professor, director, Lymphoma Program Head of hematological malignancies site disease group, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Health System, discusses treatment approaches for patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL).

In MCL, treatment approaches are dependent on the age and fitness of the patient, explains Lossos. Young fit patients may receive either AraC (Cytarabine)-based chemotherapy followed by transplant or aggressive chemotherapy without transplant. However, to date, only 1 randomized trial has demonstrated the superiority of transplant versus no transplant in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival benefit, says Lossos. More aggressive regimens may obviate the need to transplant, he adds.

In the elderly population, transplant is not recommended, and the field is moving away from using chemotherapy-based regimens in these patients. Follow-up data were presented on the use of lenalidomide (Revlimid) and rituximab (Rituxan; R2) and showed that the regimen can induce long-term responses and remissions comparable to what could be achieved with a chemotherapy-based regimen. In the relapsed population, the addition of venetoclax (Venclexta) to BTK inhibitors seems to be very promising, concludes Lossos.
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Izidore S. Lossos, MD, professor, director, Lymphoma Program Head of hematological malignancies site disease group, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Health System, discusses treatment approaches for patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL).

In MCL, treatment approaches are dependent on the age and fitness of the patient, explains Lossos. Young fit patients may receive either AraC (Cytarabine)-based chemotherapy followed by transplant or aggressive chemotherapy without transplant. However, to date, only 1 randomized trial has demonstrated the superiority of transplant versus no transplant in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival benefit, says Lossos. More aggressive regimens may obviate the need to transplant, he adds.

In the elderly population, transplant is not recommended, and the field is moving away from using chemotherapy-based regimens in these patients. Follow-up data were presented on the use of lenalidomide (Revlimid) and rituximab (Rituxan; R2) and showed that the regimen can induce long-term responses and remissions comparable to what could be achieved with a chemotherapy-based regimen. In the relapsed population, the addition of venetoclax (Venclexta) to BTK inhibitors seems to be very promising, concludes Lossos.



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