Stay tuned for our LIVE OncLive News Network coverage straight from the #ASH18 conference floor! 

Dr. Mahantshetty on Challenges With Concomitant Chemoradiation Trial in Cervical Cancer

Umesh Mahantshetty, MD, MBBS
Published: Monday, Jan 22, 2018



Umesh Mahantshetty, MD, MBBS, radiation oncologist, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, discusses challenges with a trial conducted by Tata Memorial Hospital seeking to solidify the impact of concomitant chemoradiation with FIGO stage IIIb squamous cervical cancer (NCT00193791).

The study arm of chemoradiation has the potential to improve the survival by 10%. In the study arm, apart from the standard radiotherapy treatment, patients received weekly chemotherapy injections during external radiation therapy. The study arm is associated with additional 5% acute hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, which are treatable with medications, blood transfusions, and modifications in the ongoing treatment.

Running this trial in developing countries was a challenge, says Mahantshetty, since this trial costs a lot in terms of infrastructure. Since some patients lived in far remote places, following these patients was a challenge, explains Mahantshetty. Compliance to receive concomitant chemotherapy was an additional challenge.

This trial has been implemented in routine care, says Mahantshetty, and the compliance to follow-up after receiving treatment has helped develop good outcome data.
 


Umesh Mahantshetty, MD, MBBS, radiation oncologist, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, discusses challenges with a trial conducted by Tata Memorial Hospital seeking to solidify the impact of concomitant chemoradiation with FIGO stage IIIb squamous cervical cancer (NCT00193791).

The study arm of chemoradiation has the potential to improve the survival by 10%. In the study arm, apart from the standard radiotherapy treatment, patients received weekly chemotherapy injections during external radiation therapy. The study arm is associated with additional 5% acute hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, which are treatable with medications, blood transfusions, and modifications in the ongoing treatment.

Running this trial in developing countries was a challenge, says Mahantshetty, since this trial costs a lot in terms of infrastructure. Since some patients lived in far remote places, following these patients was a challenge, explains Mahantshetty. Compliance to receive concomitant chemotherapy was an additional challenge.

This trial has been implemented in routine care, says Mahantshetty, and the compliance to follow-up after receiving treatment has helped develop good outcome data.
 

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
35th Annual Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow® Clinical Vignette SeriesJan 31, 20192.0
Oncology Briefings™: Current Perspectives on Preventing and Managing Tumor Lysis SyndromeJun 30, 20191.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x