Dr. Markman on Latest Advances in Treatment of Gynecological Malignancies

Maurie Markman, MD
Published: Wednesday, Jul 18, 2018



Maurie Markman, MD, president of Medicine and Science, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, editor-in-chief, OncologyLive, and 2018 Giant of Cancer Care® for Gynecological Cancers, discusses the latest advances in the treatment of gynecological malignancies and other tumor types.

Markman says there could not be a more exciting time to be a clinical investigator in the area of gynecological cancers. Three PARP inhibitors have now been FDA approved—niraparib (Zejula), olaparib (Lynparza), and rucaparib (Rubraca)—for patients with ovarian cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum chemotherapy. The April 2018 approval of rucaparib in the maintenance setting came in result of the pivotal ARIEL3 trial.

Checkpoint inhibitors have also been FDA approved across several tumors, and Markman is confident they will soon be approved in gynecological cancers, as well.

Markman adds that physicians continue to learn more about antiangiogenic agents, which could also represent the future of gynecologic cancer treatment.
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Maurie Markman, MD, president of Medicine and Science, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, editor-in-chief, OncologyLive, and 2018 Giant of Cancer Care® for Gynecological Cancers, discusses the latest advances in the treatment of gynecological malignancies and other tumor types.

Markman says there could not be a more exciting time to be a clinical investigator in the area of gynecological cancers. Three PARP inhibitors have now been FDA approved—niraparib (Zejula), olaparib (Lynparza), and rucaparib (Rubraca)—for patients with ovarian cancer who are in a complete or partial response to platinum chemotherapy. The April 2018 approval of rucaparib in the maintenance setting came in result of the pivotal ARIEL3 trial.

Checkpoint inhibitors have also been FDA approved across several tumors, and Markman is confident they will soon be approved in gynecological cancers, as well.

Markman adds that physicians continue to learn more about antiangiogenic agents, which could also represent the future of gynecologic cancer treatment.

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