Dr. Marron on Shortening Treatment Duration of Immunotherapy in Melanoma

Thomas Marron, MD, PhD
Published: Wednesday, Dec 11, 2019



Thomas Marron, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, hematology, and medical oncology at Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses the potential benefit of shortening the length of immunotherapy treatment in melanoma.  
 
The goal of cure may be within sight since the introduction of immunotherapy, says Marron. However, a remaining question in melanoma is when to stop treatment with immunotherapy. In previous clinical trials, nivolumab (Opdivo) was given indefinitely while pembrolizumab (Keytruda) was given for 2 years. 

It is hypothesized that prolonged treatment may not be necessary for these patients, explains Marron. Additionally, extended therapy may increase the chance of developing immune-related adverse events.
 
Shortening treatment duration would lessen the physical and financial burdens immunotherapy can cause for patients, concludes Marron.
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Thomas Marron, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine, hematology, and medical oncology at Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses the potential benefit of shortening the length of immunotherapy treatment in melanoma.  
 
The goal of cure may be within sight since the introduction of immunotherapy, says Marron. However, a remaining question in melanoma is when to stop treatment with immunotherapy. In previous clinical trials, nivolumab (Opdivo) was given indefinitely while pembrolizumab (Keytruda) was given for 2 years. 

It is hypothesized that prolonged treatment may not be necessary for these patients, explains Marron. Additionally, extended therapy may increase the chance of developing immune-related adverse events.
 
Shortening treatment duration would lessen the physical and financial burdens immunotherapy can cause for patients, concludes Marron.



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