Dr. Marshall on Personalized Chemotherapy in CRC

John L. Marshall, MD
Published: Tuesday, Mar 05, 2019



John L. Marshall, MD, chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital director, Otto J. Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancer, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses personalized chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).

When a physician first diagnoses a patient with metastatic CRC, the questions are: “Can we cure this patient, and what is the role of chemotherapy?” In reality, Marshall says, surgery is not going to be an option, and as such, you are not going to cure most patients. Treating these patients is a long process, and some doctors tend to be heavy-handed when administering chemotherapy, Marshall notes.

While some high-risk patients require aggressive chemotherapy upfront, the vast majority of patients will actually benefit from low-intensity induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy. Marshall says the question should no longer be, “How much chemotherapy should we give?” but “How little chemotherapy can we give and still control the cancer?” Fundamentally, physicians are not trying to aggressively cure the disease, but control it. It is important to not be heavy-handed with chemotherapy and create significant toxicity.
SELECTED
LANGUAGE


John L. Marshall, MD, chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital director, Otto J. Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancer, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses personalized chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).

When a physician first diagnoses a patient with metastatic CRC, the questions are: “Can we cure this patient, and what is the role of chemotherapy?” In reality, Marshall says, surgery is not going to be an option, and as such, you are not going to cure most patients. Treating these patients is a long process, and some doctors tend to be heavy-handed when administering chemotherapy, Marshall notes.

While some high-risk patients require aggressive chemotherapy upfront, the vast majority of patients will actually benefit from low-intensity induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy. Marshall says the question should no longer be, “How much chemotherapy should we give?” but “How little chemotherapy can we give and still control the cancer?” Fundamentally, physicians are not trying to aggressively cure the disease, but control it. It is important to not be heavy-handed with chemotherapy and create significant toxicity.



View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Oncology Briefings™: Individualizing Treatment After Second-Line Therapy for Patients With mCRCAug 29, 20191.0
Community Practice Connections™: Immunotherapeutic Strategies with the Potential to Transform Treatment for Genitourinary CancersAug 29, 20191.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x