Dr. Marshall on Physician Burnout in Oncology

John L. Marshall, MD
Published: Friday, Jan 31, 2020



John L. Marshall, MD, chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Medstar Georgetown University Hospital director, Otto J. Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancer, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses physician burnout in oncology.

In recent publications, oncologists ranked among the most likely specialists to experience burnout. Additionally, reports have shown an exceedingly high rate of suicide in this field.

Physical and mental exhaustion are contributing factors to physician burnout, says Marshall. As a result, some physicians are leaving the oncology space earlier in their careers.

With fewer professionals in the field, patient volume increases for practicing oncologists, explains Marshall.

Combatting these statistics will require proactive efforts from the cancer community, Marshall concludes.
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John L. Marshall, MD, chief, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Medstar Georgetown University Hospital director, Otto J. Ruesch Center for the Cure of Gastrointestinal Cancer, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses physician burnout in oncology.

In recent publications, oncologists ranked among the most likely specialists to experience burnout. Additionally, reports have shown an exceedingly high rate of suicide in this field.

Physical and mental exhaustion are contributing factors to physician burnout, says Marshall. As a result, some physicians are leaving the oncology space earlier in their careers.

With fewer professionals in the field, patient volume increases for practicing oncologists, explains Marshall.

Combatting these statistics will require proactive efforts from the cancer community, Marshall concludes.



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