Dr. Mesa on the FDA Approval of Fedratinib in Myelofibrosis

Ruben Mesa, MD
Published: Thursday, Jan 16, 2020



Ruben Mesa, MD, the director of the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the approval of a second JAK inhibitor, fedratinib (Inrebic), to join ruxolitinib (Jakafi) as a treatment option for patients with myelofibrosis.

Having a second JAK inhibitor available to patients opens the door to additional therapies over time, as exemplified in other myeloid-related disorders, such as chronic myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and acute myeloid leukemia, explains Mesa. Ruxolitinib and fredratinib are different compounds even though they are of the same class of agents.

Having a second therapy most clearly impacts patients with myelofibrosis who are already on therapy, says Mesa. Before fedratinib was approved, patients who had a suboptimal response to ruxolitinib did not have many options if they were not willing to travel for clinical trials. For newly diagnosed patients moving forward, research will continue to see what subgroup of patients each agent most effectively treats, concludes Mesa.
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Ruben Mesa, MD, the director of the Mays Cancer Center at UT Health San Antonio MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses the approval of a second JAK inhibitor, fedratinib (Inrebic), to join ruxolitinib (Jakafi) as a treatment option for patients with myelofibrosis.

Having a second JAK inhibitor available to patients opens the door to additional therapies over time, as exemplified in other myeloid-related disorders, such as chronic myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and acute myeloid leukemia, explains Mesa. Ruxolitinib and fredratinib are different compounds even though they are of the same class of agents.

Having a second therapy most clearly impacts patients with myelofibrosis who are already on therapy, says Mesa. Before fedratinib was approved, patients who had a suboptimal response to ruxolitinib did not have many options if they were not willing to travel for clinical trials. For newly diagnosed patients moving forward, research will continue to see what subgroup of patients each agent most effectively treats, concludes Mesa.



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