Dr. Mutch Discusses Radiation Versus Targeted Therapy in Endometrial Cancer

David Mutch, MD
Published: Monday, Feb 12, 2018



David Mutch, MD, Ira C. and Judith Gall professor, vice chair of obstetrics and gynecology, chief, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, discusses whether or not a patient with high-risk endometrial cancer should receive external beam radiation therapy.

There are several trials that suggest that patients with high-risk endometrial cancer should not receive external beam radiation. GOG-99 identified a high- and intermediate-risk group of patients with endometrial cancer. The findings of which showed a decreased risk of central disease but not an overall survival benefit to post-operative external beam radiation therapy.

According to Mutch, it became standard of care to give radiation therapy to this group because it decreased the risk of local recurrence, but the overall survival was the same.

That theme has been carried through the European trial PORTEC-1, with data showing that vaginal brachytherapy will decrease the local recurrence rate, as will external beam radiation therapy. However, there are more complications associated with external beam radiation therapy, prompting the Europeans to choose brachytherapy in this group of patients.
 


David Mutch, MD, Ira C. and Judith Gall professor, vice chair of obstetrics and gynecology, chief, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, discusses whether or not a patient with high-risk endometrial cancer should receive external beam radiation therapy.

There are several trials that suggest that patients with high-risk endometrial cancer should not receive external beam radiation. GOG-99 identified a high- and intermediate-risk group of patients with endometrial cancer. The findings of which showed a decreased risk of central disease but not an overall survival benefit to post-operative external beam radiation therapy.

According to Mutch, it became standard of care to give radiation therapy to this group because it decreased the risk of local recurrence, but the overall survival was the same.

That theme has been carried through the European trial PORTEC-1, with data showing that vaginal brachytherapy will decrease the local recurrence rate, as will external beam radiation therapy. However, there are more complications associated with external beam radiation therapy, prompting the Europeans to choose brachytherapy in this group of patients.
 

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Community Practice Connections™: Working Group to Optimize Outcomes in EGFR-mutated Lung Cancers: Evolving Concepts for Nurses to Facilitate and Improve Patient CareJun 30, 20181.5
Oncology Briefings™: Overcoming Chronic Iron Overload in Pediatric AML and MDSJun 30, 20181.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x