Dr. Nangia on the SCALP Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Julie R. Nangia, MD
Published: Monday, Dec 12, 2016



Julie R. Nangia, MD, assistant professor, Breast Center-Clinic, faculty senator, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses the results of the Scalp Cooling Alopecia Prevention trial (SCALP) for patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Researchers planned to evaluate 235 participants on the trial, randomized in a 2:1 ratio of scalp cooling with the Orbis Paxman Hair Loss Prevention System to control, Nangia explains. After 142 women were evaluable for the primary endpoint—which was hair retention after 4 cycles of chemotherapy—the study ended early due to the strong efficacy shown with the device. 

Results of a pre-planned interim analysis, which occurred after 95 patients received the device and 47 women were on the control arm, showed that 50% of those who received scalp cooling retained their hair, and 0% of patients on the control arm retained their hair. 

The overall message is that scalp cooling devices are safe and effective, she adds. Nangia hopes these devices will soon become available for patients worldwide.
 


Julie R. Nangia, MD, assistant professor, Breast Center-Clinic, faculty senator, Baylor College of Medicine, discusses the results of the Scalp Cooling Alopecia Prevention trial (SCALP) for patients with early-stage breast cancer.

Researchers planned to evaluate 235 participants on the trial, randomized in a 2:1 ratio of scalp cooling with the Orbis Paxman Hair Loss Prevention System to control, Nangia explains. After 142 women were evaluable for the primary endpoint—which was hair retention after 4 cycles of chemotherapy—the study ended early due to the strong efficacy shown with the device. 

Results of a pre-planned interim analysis, which occurred after 95 patients received the device and 47 women were on the control arm, showed that 50% of those who received scalp cooling retained their hair, and 0% of patients on the control arm retained their hair. 

The overall message is that scalp cooling devices are safe and effective, she adds. Nangia hopes these devices will soon become available for patients worldwide.
 

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire®: Key Questions for the Use of Immunotherapy Throughout the Disease Continuum for NSCLC in an Era of Rapid DevelopmentSep 29, 20181.5
Provider and Caregiver Connection™: Addressing Patient Concerns While Managing GlioblastomaSep 29, 20182.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x