Dr. O'Regan on Biosimilar Education in Breast Cancer

Ruth O'Regan, MD
Published: Thursday, Dec 19, 2019



Ruth O’Regan, MD, professor, division head, Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, associate director, Clinical Research, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, discusses patient education as biosimilars are implemented into practice for breast cancer.

As biosimilars begin to integrate into breast cancer treatment, physicians must be prepared to answer patient questions regarding what are biosimilars, if they are as effective as the original drugs, and more, explains O’Regan. The University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center is preparing a patient education packet about biosimilars to allow patients to read the information on their own.

O’Regan believes the bigger challenge will be in educating patients who have received treatment before rather than newly diagnosed patients. Patients with metastatic HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who have been on treatment for a few years may not be as receptive to using biosimilars, concludes O’Regan.
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Ruth O’Regan, MD, professor, division head, Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, associate director, Clinical Research, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, discusses patient education as biosimilars are implemented into practice for breast cancer.

As biosimilars begin to integrate into breast cancer treatment, physicians must be prepared to answer patient questions regarding what are biosimilars, if they are as effective as the original drugs, and more, explains O’Regan. The University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center is preparing a patient education packet about biosimilars to allow patients to read the information on their own.

O’Regan believes the bigger challenge will be in educating patients who have received treatment before rather than newly diagnosed patients. Patients with metastatic HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who have been on treatment for a few years may not be as receptive to using biosimilars, concludes O’Regan.



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