Dr. Parekh on Evolving Treatment Landscape in Myeloma

Samir Parekh, MBBS
Published: Tuesday, Nov 20, 2018



Samir Parekh, MBBS, associate professor of medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses how an increase in the understanding of myeloma has led to the development of novel therapies.

Researchers have developed more effective ways to understand the biology and microenvironment of the disease, which has led to novel treatment strategies for patients, Parekh says. Specifically, oncologists at Mount Sinai Hospital are using cutting-edge technology to develop biomarkers, which will ultimately lead to new disease targets. As more drugs enter the crowded myeloma treatment landscape, Parekh says that it is crucial for physicians to understand the bone marrow environment as well as the tumor microenvironment.

Small molecule inhibitors such as selinexor and venetoclax (Venclexta) have significantly impacted the field, and ongoing research is looking at new agents in this class. The median survival for patients with myeloma has dramatically improved in recent years, Parekh says, and there is newfound hope in where the field is headed. In the future, he sees myeloma transforming from a potentially fatal cancer to more of a manageable, chronic disease.
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Samir Parekh, MBBS, associate professor of medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses how an increase in the understanding of myeloma has led to the development of novel therapies.

Researchers have developed more effective ways to understand the biology and microenvironment of the disease, which has led to novel treatment strategies for patients, Parekh says. Specifically, oncologists at Mount Sinai Hospital are using cutting-edge technology to develop biomarkers, which will ultimately lead to new disease targets. As more drugs enter the crowded myeloma treatment landscape, Parekh says that it is crucial for physicians to understand the bone marrow environment as well as the tumor microenvironment.

Small molecule inhibitors such as selinexor and venetoclax (Venclexta) have significantly impacted the field, and ongoing research is looking at new agents in this class. The median survival for patients with myeloma has dramatically improved in recent years, Parekh says, and there is newfound hope in where the field is headed. In the future, he sees myeloma transforming from a potentially fatal cancer to more of a manageable, chronic disease.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Rapid Reviews in Oncology®: Practice-Changing Data in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rapid Update From Atlanta OnlineDec 21, 20182.0
Community Practice Connections™: 2nd Annual European Congress on Hematology™: Focus on Lymphoid MalignanciesDec 30, 20182.0
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