Dr. Patterson Discusses Concerns With TKIs in Children With CML

Briana Patterson, MD
Published: Tuesday, May 15, 2018



Briana Patterson, MD, assistant professor, Division of Endocrinology, Aflac Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, discusses concerns regarding the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of children with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).

Children are very different from the typical patient with CML, who is often an older adult or elderly. Since pediatric patients are still growing, there is concern for the endocrine effects that a TKI can have. Patterson says that decreased linear growth can occur, meaning that children with CML will end up being shorter than their peers. Importantly, thyroid function can be affected, as well as glucose metabolism.

Patterson says that there is little known on the impact of TKIs on reproductive health, as most of the literature on long-term use of TKIs has been in geriatric patients, where it is not an issue. The future reproductive potential of a child with cancer should be a concern for the physician and caregiver, Patterson emphasizes.


Briana Patterson, MD, assistant professor, Division of Endocrinology, Aflac Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, discusses concerns regarding the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of children with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).

Children are very different from the typical patient with CML, who is often an older adult or elderly. Since pediatric patients are still growing, there is concern for the endocrine effects that a TKI can have. Patterson says that decreased linear growth can occur, meaning that children with CML will end up being shorter than their peers. Importantly, thyroid function can be affected, as well as glucose metabolism.

Patterson says that there is little known on the impact of TKIs on reproductive health, as most of the literature on long-term use of TKIs has been in geriatric patients, where it is not an issue. The future reproductive potential of a child with cancer should be a concern for the physician and caregiver, Patterson emphasizes.

View Conference Coverage
Online CME Activities
TitleExpiration DateCME Credits
Medical Crossfire®: Key Questions for the Use of Immunotherapy Throughout the Disease Continuum for NSCLC in an Era of Rapid DevelopmentSep 29, 20181.5
Provider and Caregiver Connection™: Addressing Patient Concerns While Managing GlioblastomaSep 29, 20182.0
Publication Bottom Border
Border Publication
x