Dr. Pecora on the Role of Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

Andrew L. Pecora, MD
Published: Friday, Jun 22, 2018



Andrew L. Pecora, MD, president of the Physician Services Division and chief innovation officer at Hackensack Meridian Health, discusses the role of stem cell transplant in patients with multiple myeloma.

Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been proven to improve survival in in patients with multiple myeloma, regardless of whether the procedure was done upfront, after an induction regimen, or at the time of progression. The question, states Pecora, is whether or not the data is applicable to older patients, as most of the trials were done in a population under the age of 65.

Physicians at the John Theurer Cancer Center analyzed their patients at or above the age of 75 and compared the data to their younger patients. The data was nearly superimposable, says Pecora. The toxicities and benefits were similar in the older patients versus the younger patients. Although a larger prospective trial is needed to prove that, the current data strongly suggest that physicians can safely apply ASCT in the appropriate patient that is 75-year old or older with the right performance status, no comorbidities, and proper organ function, concludes Pecora.
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Andrew L. Pecora, MD, president of the Physician Services Division and chief innovation officer at Hackensack Meridian Health, discusses the role of stem cell transplant in patients with multiple myeloma.

Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been proven to improve survival in in patients with multiple myeloma, regardless of whether the procedure was done upfront, after an induction regimen, or at the time of progression. The question, states Pecora, is whether or not the data is applicable to older patients, as most of the trials were done in a population under the age of 65.

Physicians at the John Theurer Cancer Center analyzed their patients at or above the age of 75 and compared the data to their younger patients. The data was nearly superimposable, says Pecora. The toxicities and benefits were similar in the older patients versus the younger patients. Although a larger prospective trial is needed to prove that, the current data strongly suggest that physicians can safely apply ASCT in the appropriate patient that is 75-year old or older with the right performance status, no comorbidities, and proper organ function, concludes Pecora.



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